roger murray-evans

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  • in reply to: 4 or 6 bladed fans #5703
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Ben, I would leave the 6 blade fan alone until you have the car in regular use.If it didn’t have an electric fan prior to now, there is no great reason to fit one unless you intend spending a lot of time in hot traffic and the car struggles.If this turns out to be the case, you’ll find yourself fitting the 6 blade fan back on. Access to the points is not that bad esp. if you intend fitting electronic ignition. Far better to fit an unobtrusive electric fuel pump, which will eliminate the churning of the starter to get the fuel up to the mechanical pump.Also will help greatly in overcoming fuel vapourisation in warm conditions.

    Roger

     

    in reply to: M70 using a lot of water – any ideas why? #5702
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    John,I presume we are talking about an M Type?Oil pressure is very average, and nothing to do with your problem.The first thing you must address is the temperature gauge if you are running at 150C.That is 1 1/2 times boiling point!Assuming the gauge is disfunctional, and that you are not continuously boiling the coolant, it would be quite normal for a radiator, having been filled to the brim, to displace 1.5L water through the overflow system as the water warms up and expands.Try not to top up the radiator before doing quite a few more miles and determine if the 1.5L is a fairly constant refill volume.If it is, then you don’t need to investigate further (or top up), apart from the gauge of course!

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Save 20% on MSA competition license #5687
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Thanks James.All clear now.The old MSA has gone and has been replaced and all the licences are completely re-formatted.

    Cheers and a Happy New Year to you too!/Roger

     

     

     

    in reply to: Save 20% on MSA competition license #5677
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    James, I’ve been out of the competition side of things for a while.I’ve tried looking for the MSA and National A licences. I can’t find any reference to either anywhere.Any clues?

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Freeing up siezed brake cylinder pistons #5618
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Tim, I’d not be too happy at the pulling to either side if it were me.As well as what Mel writes, do the linings look as though the contact areas  between shoes and drums look the same on both sides of the car?I really can’t remember touching the front brakes on the car at all when I had it here, although I did fit reconned Phase 1 rear cylinders, which took forever to stop weeping.I wanted to chuck them down the road and fit the Phase 2 rear cylinders, but TE was happy with them as they were.It didn’t get much use in his ownership.Perhaps 100 miles max.As the fronts are not seized(?) on the right hand side (they DO seize, solid or partially, very easily!!) I’d be whipping all 4 of the pistons out for a clean up generally, and a  regrease with the red stuff.This is almost an annual event for me on Phase 2 fronts.They really work very well indeed if all 4 are functioning as they should, especially so on a lightweight car such as yours.

    As a matter of interest, it is quite possible to believe that your Phase 1 rear brakes are perfectly OK, especially if the handbrake is functioning well, when in fact, hydraulicly, they are seized solid (and may have been so for years) especially if you are not a regular MOT man.It is quite legal to request your tester on the now voluntary MOT test, to use a Tapley meter, instead of checking the car on the MOT brake rollers.The Tapley meter will show all is well with the overall hydraulic braking performance, since rear brakes offer much less assistance, working or otherwise, and the hand brake will easily lock the brakes on the mechanical circuit, leading to the false conclusion that the rears are OK.

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Freeing up siezed brake cylinder pistons #5606
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Ben and Tim,                                                                                          Yes, I should have said that the manual adjustable XK120 and in fact the XK140 brake hydraulics, are the same as the Phase 2 Allard fitment.The master cylinder is also the same.Jaguar also messed about with self adjusting brakes during the production of the 140, I believe, before reverting to the micram adjuster system at some point so be sure that what you buy looks the same.I assume the retailers are either unaware that they fit the later Allards, or feel that the average Allard owner can afford the premium for the same thing!                                                    None of the above applies to the Phase 1 brakes on Allards unfortunately.And Tim is quite correct when it comes to fitting new hydraulics.Don’t bother until you’re very very close to putting them into service.New or old, they do have a habit of seizing the pistons in the bores.I regularly have to tweak the front pistons on my cars, especially after a winter layup.Probably caused by iron pistons in aluminium bores coupled with hygroscopic brake fluid.

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Freeing up siezed brake cylinder pistons #5603
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Ben, If you think that knocking the wheel cylinders out is the end of your problem then imagine what the bores are going to look like after so many years of corrosion.Not only will you have chucked away the cost of the repair kits you’ll have wasted many hours better spent elsewhere on the car. You can buy a set of 6 wheel cylinders for an XK120 (as advertised on Ebay) for £242 all in, less the cost of the repair kits you won’t need (£80?)and your estimate for doing the job properly and safely looks fragile.We all want to save money, but there’s a time and place for that and brakes ain’t it I’m afraid.Hang on to the handbrake levers on the rear cylinders as they may differ from the aftermarket efforts.

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Cadillac 365 Bell housing #5579
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Ron, all 365s came with an auto box.What are you intending to fit?If a manual ‘box then Google Wilcap and they have a couple of what you need.

    Roger

     

    in reply to: Cadillac 331ohv v8 engine number #5574
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Max, having re-read thru my old files of the Cadillac numbering system of the day it would seem that my memory wasn’t too far out, but it would appear that Cadillac engines were issued a seperate engine number upon manufacture (at the rear) and those destined for non Cadillac applications were not stamped at the front right of the block at all.This front numbering only happened when the recipient Cadillac vehicle was allocated that engine and that vehicles’ VIN was then stamped on the front of the block.The engine fitted into my J2X is a 1950 block and has the early EUN at front and back!This leaves you to uncover the rear stamping to id your number, and potentially you have the possibility that yours was always an original non-Cad fitment or, as I mentioned in my earlier posting, machined off during an earlier decking process to straighten the top of the block.

    Roger

    in reply to: Cadillac 331ohv v8 engine number #5567
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Max, As Neil has described, it’s at the front most extreme part of the RH side of the cylinder block.However, It can be prone to disappear when the block is resurfaced on the mill.There is occasionally another point where the number is stamped, certainly on the very early 1949/50 blocks, and that is on the top of the bellhousing area of the block, about 2″ to the rear of the distributor hole, on a small flat area integral with a casting rib. As it’s not a milled surface, the numbers are stamped straight onto the surface of the casting.As a matter of interest, many of these early blocks don’t always follow the normal/later numbering practice as described by Neil, but have just a short letter+number combo, such as 6M55 or 6M183.Certainly some of the earliest works Cadillac engines for J2 and,I believe, JRs had these.The later 365/390 blocks, I believe, also have an engine number stamped on a machined surface on the lower, left hand side of the block  in the area of the dipstck tube base/sump flange.I’m hoping your car doesn’t have one of these!Regarding your oil leaks.It may be prudent to extend the dipstick tube to the top of the block.Will require an appropriately longer dipstick!This should alleviate overspill especially on hard right hand corners.The ‘normal’ oil breathing arrangement of a ‘road draught’ tube at the back of the lifter valley cover, can be utilised for purposes of MSA spillage requirements by shortening the tube, rotatating to point at the gap betwix the rear of the LH inlet manifold and distributor and fed into a catch tank on the LHS of the engine bay.Likewise, you may wish to replace the oil filler/breather cap arrangement, by having a screw on cap without a hole, and letting in a breather pipe to also end up at the catch tank.

    Hope this helps

    Roger

    in reply to: Steering Boxes and Columns #5539
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Neil,

    Further to my earlier posting, and having removed my J2X steering wheel,

    the steering wheel on that is actually solid/non taper with a clamp bolt

    thru the steering wheel boss.The prewar car has a solid taper/key with an end nut.

    Hopefully you will presented with no further alternatives!

    RM-E

     

     

     

     

    in reply to: Steering Boxes and Columns #5537
    roger murray-evansroger murray-evans
    Participant

    Neil, Marles steering boxes with solid columns and taper keyways
    were used on pretty much all of the competition cars (J2/2X/R and anything
    else that didn’t use a steering wheel horn push/indicator switch).The hollow/splined shafts were used on the road cars.
    Best wishes
    rm-e

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)